Miss Saigon
Mar30

Miss Saigon

Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg’s Miss Saigon has taken its second helicopter ride across the Atlantic from London, and landed right back at the Broadway Theatre, where it first set down in 1991 under heavy enemy fire.

Read More
JOHN O’HURLEY – A MAN WITH STANDARDS
Mar29

JOHN O’HURLEY – A MAN WITH STANDARDS

So the premise of his show, john O’Hurley, A Man With Standards, we are told, is to look back over his shoulder at the past that gave him so much as a child and the career that has served him very well in deed.  Between soap operas and sit coms he has done himself proud and made his dreams come true.

Read More
Latin History For Morons
Mar28

Latin History For Morons

John Leguizamo’s “Latin History for Morons”, now at the Public Theater is not for morons, and it is not just a history lesson. It is an homage to heritage, to parenthood, to Leguizamo’s family and specifically to his son. Not bad.

Read More
CHURCH AND STATE
Mar28

CHURCH AND STATE

Playwright Jason Odell Williams seeks to trouble your sleep with your conscience. Church and State packs surprising philosophical punch dressed as a comedy.

Read More
The Price
Mar24

The Price

The Price by Arthur Miller, now at the American Airlines Theatre as a Roundabout Theatre production, is no stroll in the park.  The year is 1968.  Two brothers who have not seen one another in 16 years are plonked together in the attic of their old home, a brownstone in Manhattan.  In this attic is the detritus of their father’s life, and because the building is about to be demolished they are finally facing how to let go of it all.  And I don’t mean  just the furniture.   There are, as is always the case with sibling estrangement, a lot of reasons why these two have not spoken, and with a second-hand furniture dealer on hand to throw gasoline on the smoldering coals – there are explosions aplenty.  As we knew there would be from the moment the curtain goes up. No surprises here.

Read More
SPILL
Mar23

SPILL

We all know the story, remember the images of the birds, the gulls and pelicans, the turtles and other sea life covered in oil. We remember the oil spread across the Gulf of Mexico, a coating of slime and gunk destroying everything around it and beneath it, as the winds pushed it closer and closer to shore.

Read More
Murder on the Orient Express
Mar21

Murder on the Orient Express

Agatha Christie’s popular Murder on the Orient Express brought to the stage for the first time by award-winning playwright Ken Ludwig.

Read More
How To Transcend A Happy Marriage
Mar21

How To Transcend A Happy Marriage

Jeeze Louise – where do you start? I haven’t a clue. I first knew Sarah Ruhl through her fascinating play Eurydice at Second Stage. She pushed my brain around in my head in all the right ways. The story, well known though it was, was maneuvered into an incarnation that brought life, and light and a little bit of the kitchen sink along with it. With “How To Transcend A Happy Marriage” she kept me intrigued as well, but wandered off the main road so far that when the play reached its conclusion, it felt more like the bus stopped and we all had to get out as opposed to having reached a destination.

Read More
Who Would Be King
Mar21

Who Would Be King

G.K. Chesterton, the early 20th Century British man of letters said “I’ve searched all the parks in all the cities and found no statues of committees.” I only wish the committee that wrote Who Would Be King, currently playing at Ars Nova through April 1st, had taken it to heart. Presented by the Cambridge, MA based group Liars & Believers, the program says the play is written by the LAB Ensemble and then lists 13 names. Three people can’t come to an agreement on what to eat for lunch, how can thirteen people write a cohesive script? Short version…they can’t.

Read More
Chess Match No. 5
Mar21

Chess Match No. 5

Bond and Lauren even burst into dance in the middle of their philosophical talk and it is a total goofy pleasure, not to mention one of my favorite Bogart fingerprints.

Read More
Cagney The Musical – A St. Patrick’s Day Revisit
Mar17

Cagney The Musical – A St. Patrick’s Day Revisit

The reason you want to see Cagney, before it closes in May, comes in a compact package busting with a sparkle that nearly knocks you over.  Fortunately you are sitting down when Robert Creighton arrives on the stage as James Cagney.  The unfortunate part is that you will want to be leaping out of your seat before the performance concludes, because Creighton is such a smooth dancer that he makes it look easy.  This makes you think you could probably do it just as well. This probably not true.

Read More
Joan of Arc: Into The Fire
Mar16

Joan of Arc: Into The Fire

As I left the Public Theater after seeing Joan of Arc: Into The Fire, what was on my mind was not this production but George Bernard Shaw’s play, Saint Joan.  I had a craving for a play that would satisfy not only my curiosity about Joan, but my need for a well thought out story.  David Byrne’s Joan is heavy on rock music and light on story.  

Read More
American Songbook: An Evening with Kristen and Bobby Lopez
Mar14

American Songbook: An Evening with Kristen and Bobby Lopez

The stars were twinkling brighter and more plentiful on stage than in the sky on Saturday night in The Appel Room. The star-studded event, American Songbook: An Evening with Kristen and Bobby Lopez, closed the 2017 season in that venue. Lopez? I’ll give you a hint, What do the Disney movie Frozen, and the Broadway musicals The Book of Mormon, Avenue Q, and In Transit have in common? That’s right, one or both of the husband and wife team wrote the songs And Bobby is one of 12 people in history who is an “EGOT” – the recipient of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

Read More
The Light Years
Mar14

The Light Years

All in all it is a sad few decades for the Windy City.

This is a well intentioned piece, but it is missing the “WHY” that is the required center of every story ever told.

Read More
The Last Days of Judas Iscariot
Mar14

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot

In the story of Judas’s life, Stephen Adly Giurgis has found a narrative more complex and murkier than a simple tale of betrayal. He has found a metaphor for a discussion of the meaning of hope.

Read More
The Emperor Jones
Mar13

The Emperor Jones

Plenty of compelling visuals, and a mostly powerful performance by its lead. Come for the history and morality lessons, stay for the terrifying puppets.

Read More
Significant Other
Mar13

Significant Other

I laughed, I cried, I split my gloves clapping. An old cliché, but it perfectly describes my experience seeing Joshua Harmon’s Significant Other at the Booth Theater the other night. Well…all except the glove part. Who wears gloves in the theater anymore? The modern audience gives a standing ovation. So I did that. Let’s try this again. I laughed, I cried, I stood on my feet clapping. And coming from me, that’s actually high praise. I’m kind of a snob about this standing ovation business. I think it’s too easily bestowed these days.

Read More
Come From Away
Mar13

Come From Away

Come From Away is a show that is greater than the sum of its parts.  The script is iffy.  The music is not exceptional.  The sound is so loud that the lyrics are often unintelligible.  The spirit that is on that stage, however, sweeps all that aside and scoops everyone in the audience up into its arms.  The talent, it should be noted is not iffy one little bit.  Not only are they skilled actors with voices that rock, THEY LOOK LIKE US.  These are not stereotypes. There is not a beauty queen, swarthy leading man, or crotchety elder among them.  Perhaps that is because this is a true story – or perhaps it is because somebody cared.  This is, after all, the story of what happened to us all on 9/11.  No one who sees this show was untouched by that day.  And no one will leave untouched by this show.

Read More
The Glass Menagerie
Mar10

The Glass Menagerie

Sam Gold’s production of Tennessee Williams’ autobiographical masterpiece The Glass Menagerie opened on March 9th and it’s going to be the subject of a lot of controversy. You’d think that a play that has had eight Broadway productions since it opened in 1945 would have been fully explored at this point. But leave it to the iconoclastic director Sam Gold to take it to another place. And it shouldn’t surprise you that the place Gold first staged The Glass Menagerie was at Ivo Van Hove’s Toneelgroep Amsterdam.

Read More
American Songbook: The Songs of Elizabeth Swados
Mar10

American Songbook: The Songs of Elizabeth Swados

It wasn’t planned to coincide, but it sure is apt, that American Songbook: The Songs of Elizabeth Swados was scheduled on International Women’s Day 2017. According to Taylor Mac, the host of the evening, Ms. Swados holds the record for the youngest woman to be nominated for 5 Tony’s for Runaways in 1978. She was nominated for Best Score, Best Book, Best Director and Best Choreographer, and the musical was nominated for Best Musical. She was 27 years old at the time.

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest